1. [People Were Here] Mysteryland

    [People Were Here] Mysteryland

    1 day ago  /  1 note

  2. [People] Untitled

    [People] Untitled

    3 days ago  /  4 notes

  3. [I See It In the Clouds] Untitled

    [I See It In the Clouds] Untitled

    5 days ago  /  2 notes

  4. When I said Mother Nature showed out tonight I wasn’t kidding.

    When I said Mother Nature showed out tonight I wasn’t kidding.

    5 days ago  /  2 notes

  5. [Transit] Watch Your Step

    [Transit] Watch Your Step

    1 week ago  /  3 notes

  6. wanderingnewyork:

Looking down the tracks of the No. 7 line at a fire in Sunnyside.

    wanderingnewyork:

    Looking down the tracks of the No. 7 line at a fire in Sunnyside.

    1 week ago  /  175 notes  /  Source: wanderingnewyork

  7. wanderingnewyork:

Apartment buildings in Soundview.

Sometimes I make photos like this and think, “Yeah, but who would be interested in seeing them?” I am delighted with this Tumblr I recently discovered, so I guess there is always someone who would be interested.
I need to spend more time going with my gut than worrying about who might not like or be interested in what I find fascinating. Those who will like it will find me.

    wanderingnewyork:

    Apartment buildings in Soundview.

    Sometimes I make photos like this and think, “Yeah, but who would be interested in seeing them?” I am delighted with this Tumblr I recently discovered, so I guess there is always someone who would be interested.

    I need to spend more time going with my gut than worrying about who might not like or be interested in what I find fascinating. Those who will like it will find me.

    1 week ago  /  52 notes  /  Source: wanderingnewyork

  8. [People] Untitled

    [People] Untitled

    1 week ago  /  2 notes

  9. Compromise and comfort

    arnade:

    Cynthia was out on the streets “selling her pussy.” For drugs.  She told me that. She was dressed for that. Tight clothes that barely concealed, her “pussy pushed out” behind see-through shorts.

    She was tweaking, yet controlled. Intense and tight. She didn’t have time to talk, beyond being polite.

    She is used to being looked at. She pushed her middle into the camera, laughed, held a pose, grabbed $6 from my hands, and walked up the hill, towards a dealer, and away from the approaching rain.

    This is the picture I took.

    image

    I had wanted a tighter shot, but the sun, my recently injured leg, fast moving semi trucks, kept me from getting it.

    When I got home I changed the picture, cropping it. Why? Because I didn’t feel it captured Cynthia’s intensity, the focus on her body and her craving. I felt she was lost in the space.

    Here is what I chose. I titled it “Look at my pussy, buy me drugs.”

    image

    I wanted the viewer to feel what I felt, that “she was selling her pussy.”  I wanted the viewer to be forced to look at her middle, not her face. To feel, like I felt, uncomfortable doing so. To feel, despite the space, her body was the focus.

    After looking at it for so long, I did become uncomfortable, for the viewers sake, for my sake. It became too much. So I compromised, and chose this edit, titled “Cynthia again”

    image

    Yet I did it because, honestly, I was worried about upsetting people, worried that Facebook, twitter, Flickr, wouldn’t get it. That I would lose viewers.

    That is/was a mistake. The picture I ended up posting doesn’t reflect the awkwardness, and confusion, I felt.

    More importantly, I don’t think it reflects how Cynthia felt.

    Yet I can never really know that. Nobody, except Cynthia can.

    Which is a reminder: Art is often more about the artist (their limitations, faults, and prejudices)  than it is about the subject.

    1 week ago  /  79 notes  /  Source: arnade

  10. portraitsofboston:

     “I want to get a joint law degree and a Ph.D. in the sociology of immigration to study immigration law. My interest has a lot to do with my Haitian identity: most of my family were undocumented immigrants, and it was only because of a last-minute executive order that we managed to get our papers. I was one of only 50,000 people to gain residency from the order, but a lot of my relatives remain undocumented and are still trying to figure out the system. I don’t think such an arbitrary immigration system is fair. It tears families apart and causes a lot of stress, and that’s putting it mildly.     “That’s why I do what I do. I want to combine research and policy: most of the time, immigration law and the sociology of immigration are studied in bubbles. While there’s a ton of literature on the sociology of immigration, our immigration law is a lot less sophisticated and of lower quality. It doesn’t take into account such things as assimilation and, more importantly, doesn’t at all interact with sociological studies.     “Often, a lot of nuances are completely lost. People compare immigrants to racial “groups”, not even realizing for instance that “Latino” is not a racial group. Some statistics compare all black immigrants to African Americans. The problem is that immigrants come into this country with very different degrees of social capital. Haitian immigrants, for example, are more directly comparable to Mexican immigrants in terms of social capital than they are to Jamaican and Nigerian immigrants. For some people, however, it’s just ‘Oh, black people! They’re all the same.’      “I was also involved in the ‘I, Too, Am Harvard’ campaign. It was a good campaign, but I feel we also have to talk about the larger issues. It’s not that microaggression isn’t important, I’m just more interested in the structural forces behind it: the consistent lack of funding for schools, or the way schools regularly fail students of color. When I was in high school my teachers said to me all the time, ‘You are very articulate for a black girl.’ I heard that even when I got to Harvard, which is why it was my quote in the campaign.”     “What other examples of microaggression have you encountered?”     “When I applied to Harvard, the first thing my interviewer asked me was if I knew anyone who had died during the earthquake in Haiti. My grandmother had died four days before that. I’ve never wanted to choke someone so much. Also, when I was sixteen a friend’s parent asked me if I had AIDS.     “Yet, while it’s good to talk about how such microaggessions make you feel, sometimes the larger picture gets lost. Going back to the ‘articulate for a black girl’ example, that wasn’t the real issue for me: it was simply a small fraction of a larger structural problem that bothered me much more. My high school’s majority was black and poor – that statement expressed the fact that my teachers didn’t expect you to do well despite the circumstances. Those words made me feel bad, but what made me feel terrible was that the teachers didn’t think that it was their job to help me do better.”

    portraitsofboston:

         “I want to get a joint law degree and a Ph.D. in the sociology of immigration to study immigration law. My interest has a lot to do with my Haitian identity: most of my family were undocumented immigrants, and it was only because of a last-minute executive order that we managed to get our papers. I was one of only 50,000 people to gain residency from the order, but a lot of my relatives remain undocumented and are still trying to figure out the system. I don’t think such an arbitrary immigration system is fair. It tears families apart and causes a lot of stress, and that’s putting it mildly.
         “That’s why I do what I do. I want to combine research and policy: most of the time, immigration law and the sociology of immigration are studied in bubbles. While there’s a ton of literature on the sociology of immigration, our immigration law is a lot less sophisticated and of lower quality. It doesn’t take into account such things as assimilation and, more importantly, doesn’t at all interact with sociological studies.
         “Often, a lot of nuances are completely lost. People compare immigrants to racial “groups”, not even realizing for instance that “Latino” is not a racial group. Some statistics compare all black immigrants to African Americans. The problem is that immigrants come into this country with very different degrees of social capital. Haitian immigrants, for example, are more directly comparable to Mexican immigrants in terms of social capital than they are to Jamaican and Nigerian immigrants. For some people, however, it’s just ‘Oh, black people! They’re all the same.’
          “I was also involved in the ‘I, Too, Am Harvard’ campaign. It was a good campaign, but I feel we also have to talk about the larger issues. It’s not that microaggression isn’t important, I’m just more interested in the structural forces behind it: the consistent lack of funding for schools, or the way schools regularly fail students of color. When I was in high school my teachers said to me all the time, ‘You are very articulate for a black girl.’ I heard that even when I got to Harvard, which is why it was my quote in the campaign.”
         “What other examples of microaggression have you encountered?”
         “When I applied to Harvard, the first thing my interviewer asked me was if I knew anyone who had died during the earthquake in Haiti. My grandmother had died four days before that. I’ve never wanted to choke someone so much. Also, when I was sixteen a friend’s parent asked me if I had AIDS.
         “Yet, while it’s good to talk about how such microaggessions make you feel, sometimes the larger picture gets lost. Going back to the ‘articulate for a black girl’ example, that wasn’t the real issue for me: it was simply a small fraction of a larger structural problem that bothered me much more. My high school’s majority was black and poor – that statement expressed the fact that my teachers didn’t expect you to do well despite the circumstances. Those words made me feel bad, but what made me feel terrible was that the teachers didn’t think that it was their job to help me do better.”

    1 week ago  /  302 notes  /  Source: portraitsofboston

  11. photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    1 week ago  /  2,554 notes  /  Source: mymodernmet

  12. fyblackwomenart:

Afro by krajono

    fyblackwomenart:

    Afro by krajono

    1 week ago  /  581 notes  /  Source: blkwomenart.com

  13. portraitsofboston:

     “I come from a very troubled part of the world. I don’t really see myself as being from Saudi Arabia. I see myself as being from the Arab world, which is going through a lot of conflict and wars right now. I’m praying that things get better while trying to find a way to do my part to make it so.”     “Are you doing anything in particular?”     “I’m in grad school, but sometimes I blog. I mostly read and write. One of the hardest things I had to do before coming here was decide which books to take with me. I like to read Arabic literature. I find it very provoking and poetic. When you read poems or articles written in the 1960s and 1970s, it’s as if they are talking about today. It’s funny and frustrating at the same time. We seem to be going in circles.”

    portraitsofboston:

         “I come from a very troubled part of the world. I don’t really see myself as being from Saudi Arabia. I see myself as being from the Arab world, which is going through a lot of conflict and wars right now. I’m praying that things get better while trying to find a way to do my part to make it so.”
         “Are you doing anything in particular?”
         “I’m in grad school, but sometimes I blog. I mostly read and write. One of the hardest things I had to do before coming here was decide which books to take with me. I like to read Arabic literature. I find it very provoking and poetic. When you read poems or articles written in the 1960s and 1970s, it’s as if they are talking about today. It’s funny and frustrating at the same time. We seem to be going in circles.”

    1 week ago  /  215 notes  /  Source: portraitsofboston

  14. untrustyou:

Vincent Glielmi

    untrustyou:

    Vincent Glielmi

    (via empathme)

    1 week ago  /  544 notes  /  Source: untrustyou

  15. soteeoh:

In Summer We’ll Be Free | Toronto Street Photography | Soteeoh

    soteeoh:

    In Summer We’ll Be Free | Toronto Street Photography | Soteeoh

    (via alicewonder)

    1 week ago  /  162 notes  /  Source: soteeoh